Personal life
Feb 16, 2021

Changing careers

You’ve invested time, energy, and often money into getting where you are today… only to realise the shoe doesn’t fit. It’s an uncomfortable thought, and often comes with dread, frustration, and doubt. It can often feel like you’re taking a step back, when the reality is: you’re taking an important step towards where you need to be.

When I realised my career was no longer working for me, it came with a lot of disappointment. Getting to where I was hadn’t been easy, and coming to terms with the fact that I was at a dead-end was deflating. I felt like a failure, and I knew this change wasn’t going to be easy. Despite having a career that promised progression and financial security: I wasn’t fulfilled. The days were beginning to roll into one, and the longer I invested into this career, the further I felt from myself.

I faced a lot of fears. What would happen if I couldn’t break into the legal industry? Am I putting my security at risk? Am I making a mistake?

Despite this, I knew I needed to make this move. The longer I stayed in my career, the more detached I became day by day. Just surviving in a role wasn’t enough, I needed more.

I quickly learned that a career change was about so much more than a few qualifications. It was intrinsically tied to my self esteem, my self worth, and my belief in my ability to achieve. I started by breaking down my goal into parts. Scaling a task like this can seem impossible, until you remember anything important was achieved one step at a time.

I set out a budget.

I researched courses.

I took a hard look at where my time was invested, and began to focus my energy on bringing me closer to the legal industry.

I sought out advice. I networked. I spoke to people in the industry, and I found the more I spoke about my aims, the more real it became.

Making a career change is difficult. It takes a real investment of your time and energy.

My move into law wasn’t immediate, and you shouldn’t expect instant success from yourself either. You’ll experience highs and lows, you’ll face obstacles, and you’ll battle with doubt.

The important thing is that you keep going.

Making a career change is difficult. It takes a real investment of your time and energy. But it’s important to remember, you’re investing in yourself. You’re telling yourself you’re worth more, and you’re working hard to give yourself a better life.

When the going gets tough, remember that.

If you find yourself at the edge, wondering whether you should take the leap: I urge you to do it.

A career change may be hard, but I promise, stagnancy is harder.

Ask yourself, can I do this for the rest of my life?

If the answer is no, then why wait?

You’re too important not to invest in.